Friday, January 22, 2021

Triple-star system’s strange antics entrance scientists digging through 125 years of...

Scientists have combined modern spacecraft data with vintage observations to piece together a 125-year-long story of the antics of a nearby triple-star system dubbed...

Gas giant exoplanet with weirdly long orbit may bear clues about...

Scientists have managed to measure both the size and orbit of a gas giant exoplanet nearly 1,300 light-years away from Earth. Dubbed GOT 'EM-1b,...

Astronomers spot the fastest spinning magnetar ever seen

Far-off in the Milky Way galaxy, 21,000 light-years from Earth, astronomers have spotted the fastest-spinning magnetar (and possibly youngest, too) ever seen. And that's...

Japanese asteroid-sampling probe begins long trek to next space rock

Japan's Hayabusa2 mission didn't rest on its laurels for long. On Dec. 5, the probe delivered a capsule containing pristine samples of the carbon-rich asteroid...

Sunquakes likely triggered deep beneath solar surface

Scientists have uncovered new details about the mysterious origin of seismic activity on the sun during solar flares. The sun intermittently unleashes electromagnetic energy in...

How satellites are stopping deforestation in Africa

Satellites are helping to reduce deforestation across Africa. Thanks to the help of Earth-orbiting satellites, deforestation, which creates significant carbon emissions and is a major...

Largest canyon in the solar system revealed in stunning new images

About 87 million miles (140 million kilometers) above the Grand Canyon, an even larger, grander abyss cuts through the gut of the Red Planet....

Are primordial black holes really giant gravitinos?

Paul M. Sutter is an astrophysicist at SUNY Stony Brook and the Flatiron Institute, host of Ask a Spaceman and Space Radio, and author...

Is there more than one dark energy?

Paul M. Sutter is an astrophysicist at SUNY Stony Brook and the Flatiron Institute, host of Ask a Spaceman and Space Radio, and author...

This is what a supernova sounds like, according to NASA

In space, nobody can hear you scream — or explode, or collapse, or slowly collide with a neighboring galaxy. But now, thanks to a...